The Greatest Showman Review

Kelly Ritenour, Clubs and Activities Editor

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One of the final movies of 2017 was The Greatest Showman, the musical that follows the story of Phineas Taylor Barnum (Hugh Jackman) and his whimsical circus dream.

The movie begins with P.T Barnum and his future wife Charity (Michelle Williams) as children. The two are separated when Charity’s wealthy and strict family forbids her to interact with Barnum and sends her off to finishing school. Charity and Barnum exchange letters during their separation and plan their perfect future together.  Showing the buildup of the characters’ relationship from a young age was an excellent choice. From the start, you are hoping for this young couple to succeed.

The cast in this film is a well-blended group of big-name actors and Broadway professionals. Hugh Jackman’s passionate voice gives every musical number its spirit. Keala Settle, who played Lettie Lutz, the bearded lady, was also celebrated for her beautiful broadway voice and her lead in the song “This is me” which has an Oscar nomination for best song.

The overall soundtrack for the movie was breathtaking and incredibly memorable. Many fans commented that the music brought them to tears. It also inspired covers like Kesha’s cover of “This Is Me.”

The choreography was also a memorable feature of the film. The dance numbers were enthralling and varied from gorgeously filmed ballroom dances in a foggy train station to mind-blowing trapeze stunts.

One complaint on social media that a lot of people had when the trailer was released was that the movie glorified P.T Barnum. Although he had a momentous amount of achievements, Barnum was not a perfect person. Thankfully the film touched on these issues without losing its grandeur. If anything, it added more depth and reality to the character.

Overall, the movie has generated a large presence of fan following and musical mania. It is without a doubt that the film truly presents its major motivation: to put on the greatest show.

 

 

 

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